Tag Archives: environment

Markers – ready!

marker refill

It’s always fun getting ready to host a graphic facilitation workshop and I have one coming up Aug 15-16 in Prince George (a few spaces left in case you are keen).  What I love is the opportunity to sift through my books, resources and extensive marker collection!

One of my marker favourites are the Neuland markers. I use a range of Number Ones and the Big Ones. I not only enjoy the wide nib and feel of the marker, what I particularly think is cool is that I can refill them. In the photo above you can see my marker is upside down and has a tiny hole in the top of the green circle. The bottle beside with the clear bulb on top is refill ink. Thus whenever you run out of ink you can fill the marker up. It feels really good to not throw away the marker (I do that with other ones that I really love despite feeling wasteful).

The refillable marker was also an incentive given the cost of buying these markers (they are imported from Germany). However, if you decide you do want to try them, the shipping fee is flat rate to a certain weight so you can share an order with friends or buy as much as you can within the weight limit! I bought refills for all my colours which has been handy. Though, after using the markers for several years I realize I should have bought more black ink refill. I love the black most 🙂

What are your favourite markers? Any recommendations I should share with the participants in Prince George?

 

 

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David Suzuki came to town

Last night I had the honour to listen to David Suzuki, one of Canada’s national heros, in Castlegar, B.C., Canada as part of the Mir Center for Peace Lecture Series.  He is an inspiring and passionate speaker on the environment.  It is clear why we have all been glued to his TV shows, such as CBC’s The Nature of Things, since the 1970’s.  Dr. Suzuki reflected on being an elder (i.e. 74 yrs old), and that the questions haven’t changed much over the years.  These questions include: Who are we? How did we get here? and What’s it all about?

The lecture summarized some key points on the need to recognize the basics of life, biodiversity and role of the human brain in getting us to where we are today.  He wholeheartedly emphasized the need to put the eco (house) back into economics and start valuing the very elements in this world we need to survive.   He challenged us to see the world as it really is, to slow down, and reimagine the future.

While I respect this man and all he has done to communicate environmental issues to the public, I found his talk lacking on some key points, namely that of equity.  Firstly, the lecture focused on the footprint that 6.8 billion people have on the world. This aggregate number misses the point that most of the population is living in poverty and that the impact is our responsibility as North American/Western consumers.  Secondly, he spoke of the need to limit growth.  Again, there are many countries in this world that need growth while others need to question their growth, both quantitatively and qualitatively.   The rights of less developed countries to develop should be recognized.  Thirdly, Dr. Suzuki challenged us to see the world as it really is, i.e. a tree can be lumber or a tree can be the lungs of the earth.  He was referring to the latter.   My question is who decides the definition?  In a globalized world, we need to respect the rights of local people and hence poor people often see resources differently than we do (i.e. that tree is shelter, energy, medicine and food).  Sustainable use is a more equitable option than preservation in many cases.

Suzuki focused on his world view, a deep green view in which we are all animals.  My take on the situation is slightly more pragmatic.   It’s not a one-sized fits all for the planet.  Biodiversity is key, including human diversity. This means there will be trade offs and everyone will have to give a little, some will need to give more and take less.  We are fortunate here in Western Canada. We need to expand our world view beyond the geography in our backyard and support efforts for others in the world to gain access to their land, resources and rights to an income.  Recognizing the needs of poor people and the planet will hopefully lead to a healthier planet for all.   With a captive audience at the Mir Center, Suzuki missed an opportunity to provide the fuller picture of our global dilemma.

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Filed under Kootenay Life, Uncategorized