Tag Archives: effective meetings

Planning meetings? Can visuals help? Learn the basics at our 2018 Graphic Facilitation Workshop

I’m planning a meeting for May where a group of scientists will come together to plan their reporting on five years of study. In their case they have been monitoring glaciers and snow melt. I am tasked with helping bring together the different studies to come under one technical report. The report should help connect the work of everyone together to tell a bigger story (hopefully).

When looking at ways to think and write together, I surfed through the list serve of one of my favourite networks (www.km4dev.org) which is full of people who help bring knowledge beyond the individual. On one thread a variety of awesome tools were listed. These included using kanban boards, ecocycle planning and visual facilitation. Wow!

whole-board

While I haven’t used the kanban board specifically as a tool, I have unintentionally done similar processes and I will certainly consider this in planning with the scientists. I have used the ecocycle a fair bit (and love it) though I think its not the best tool for our needs at this meeting. As far as visual facilitation, I will be brainstorming up numerous ways to embed this into our meeting to help us stay on track, communicate as a group, see the bigger picture and have more FUN!

If you are keen to learn more about visual facilitation / graphic facilitation, want to get the most out of your meetings and your planning, consider joining us to learn the basics of the art (no experience necessary) – July 9-10, 2018 in Rossland, BC, Canada.

More details here!

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Great meeting and art? Try Graphic Facilitation

My Ideas - 35

Lovely facilitator drawing by Nancy White, graphic facilitator extraordinaire.

I recently read an article that states, “..a new Drexel University study found that making art can significantly reduce stress-related hormones in your body.” And apparently everyone can benefit!¬†Markers, paper, clay and collage were all used in the study.

How might those who plan and attend meetings make the most of this information? For me, it reinforces that taking time to allow participants to ‘hold the pen’, draw together and be creative is important. This could be in the form an ice breaker but also in how we achieve the concrete tasks of the meeting as well. You don’t need to be an artist to include visual and creative elements to your meetings! There are simple and fun ways to reduce stress, engage the group and create meaning beyond words. I started playing with these tools in 2005 and have been hooked ever since. Why? After reading this study, I think it not only reduces stress for the participants but also for the person leading the group ūüôā

If utilizing these types of tools is something you think would be useful in your toolkit, check out a graphic facilitation workshop to gain the skills and confidence to support groups and organizations to make the most of their meetings. I’m offering a workshop July 9-10, 2018 in BC, Canada – please join me!

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Meeting intros…beyond the go around.

extra_speed_meeting-blue

A few weeks ago, I got a request from someone new to facilitation asking about a great way to do introductions at a meeting. I have a lot of icebreakers up my sleeve but I was testing out something new at another meeting and had been given some ideas from an online group too. I wanted to feel it out before replying. After testing out some new things and thinking about the games I was suggested, my advice went back to something tried and true that I find a fabulous way to start a meeting.

One thing I’ve always found fun is a 3 round speed meeting. Its helpful to have a chance to meet the people you are going to be working with for the next few hours / days/etc. upfront. It can be very simple or you can put a spin on it to go deeper into your meeting content. The instructions are something like this:

  • Find someone you don’t know and introduce yourselves.
  • You have 3 minutes for the first round and then I will ring a bell and you have to meet another person (90 seconds each during your intros).
  • Do it 3 times
  • Regroup together, stand in a circle and ask people how that was for them. ¬†Do a go-around or a ‘popcorn’ to get feedback.
  • Remind people that often we sit in meetings and don’t know who is around the room. If they didn’t get to meet everyone, take time during the breaks to continue the introductions.

If you want to go DEEPER or be more focused on the meeting itself, similar to above but:

  • Give them 4 mins per round (2 mins each to share)
  • During the intros, ask them to tell each other what they hope to get out of the meeting.
  • During the debrief, ask for examples of what people said they are hoping to get out of the meeting. Ask people if most people they met had similar expectations or where they different? How were they different? What does that mean for the meeting? Ask if anybody has anything further to add that wasn’t said.

Even though each person will only have done 3 rounds, they will know more and have more depth than a simple go around sharing names and where they work.

In general, I believe the debrief for every session/activity is a key part of the session. “What, So What, Now What” are 3 questions to consider for each session you do. Even the introductions can set the tone for the type of meeting you are going to have.

Good luck!

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Announcing two workshops for September 2016

This year I am very excited to host two workshops focused on the use of visuals in our facilitation practice.

The first is called My Pens, Our Pens and is a brand new offering Sept 16-17. This is being developed with Nancy White (my co-conspirator of the last six years). We are treading into new territory as we explore the role of visuals in design and facilitation.   This is not your traditional workshop. We are looking to push our boundaries (and yours) in terms of the role of visuals in design and facilitation. We will ask hard questions about who captures content and what is its use?  Can visual methods help reporting out be more meaningful? What is the role of metaphor? Constraints? Where are there visual opportunities in process design? When does it make sense to use visuals and where does it detract from the process? What is the process of others capturing and harvesting content? For those joining and wanting an introduction to drawing on walls, there is an optional half-day Sept 15 to teach the basics.

The second is the 7th annual  Rosviz graphic facilitation workshop. This two-day experiential workshop provides the fundamentals needed to get started drawing on walls, use visuals to achieve your goals or hone your existing practice (Sept 19-20). Whether helping communities plan their futures or groups track progress, we will provide the skills and confidence needed to use a range of visuals in your work and engage beyond words.

Workshop details for both offerings are found here!

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Graphic Facilitation 2015 – Skills, Innovation and Fun!

I am very excited to be co-hosting the 6th Annual Graphic Facilitation Workshop in Rossland, BC July 13-14th, 2015.

rosviz2015_poster_master.

Have you noticed how companies and organizations are using visuals more and more in the way they communicate with customers, employees and communities? Learn the tricks of the trade in two days packed with practical skills, confidence building and FUN!

If you are interested in ENGAGING BEYOND WORDS and looking for innovative ways to spice up your practice, this workshop is a fabulous experience.

In the words of 2x participant Fern:

‚ÄúI wanted to send a quick thank you for hosting such a wonderful workshop. I had a fabulous time and learned a lot, even though I already took the workshop 4 years ago I was thrilled to have the opportunity to take again. The content is rich, the hands on application powerful, the people genuine and the instructors first class. Being immersed in this creative process for two whole days is an amazing experience, I would recommend it to anyone interested in learning more about graphic facilitation and how it can help positively transform group process.‚ÄĚ (Fern Sabo, 2x participant, 2010 & 2014)

What is it exactly?

Sometimes our imaginations are sparked by a visual where words fail us.¬†¬†Many of us are visual thinkers.¬†¬†Think about when communities plan and imagine their futures, when teams consider the possible outcomes for their projects, when groups create maps to track their progress. ¬†This experiential workshop focuses on engaging people beyond words and text and takes place almost entirely at the drawing surface. You can expect to go away with icons, ideas and approaches for embedding visuals into your work – which you can use immediately, as well as ideas about how to hone your current practice.¬†¬†No drawing experience needed (leave your inner censor at the door ūüôā

Dates: July 13-14th; times to be confirmed

Rate: $850 + GST (5%)

HOT DEALS:

  • Bring a friend and you both get¬†$50 off!
  • Three people registering from one organization? Bring the fourth one¬†FREE!

 Full Details HERE!

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What would a family friendly community meeting look like (besides noisy)?

family-support-group

Recently, I attended a public meeting held at the local community hall to share the latest findings from a city budget engagement process. While it would have been easier to go on my own, my husband was out of town and the only way I could attend (and show my support for our new council) was if I brought my children (a 2 year old and a 5 month old baby).

My biggest concern for this meeting was how to get everyone out of the house on time and what snacks to bring that wouldn’t create a mess (the time of the meeting crossed our dinner hour). Having worked in many countries around the world where children are integrated into all aspects of community life, I feel comfortable bringing my kids with me to most meetings. In fact, I just returned from three weeks working in Nepal with my son who was four months at the time. It had not crossed my mind whether we would be welcome (or not) at this meeting in our community hall.

For the most part people were quite helpful and nice. The facilitator had brought his young son, which helped set the tone of inclusiveness. That said there were no other children in the room. The turnout was likely the best ever for a budget meeting though it was demographically homogenous.

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Thankfully no one had to ‚Äėsit silently‚Äô through lengthy presentations. Most¬†of the meeting was spent walking around talking to your neighbours about what was important to everyone for budget priorities. The facilitator was top-notch and everyone was on task.

After about an hour and half, the meeting closed with a sharing circle of fifty people. It was a nice touch however this is exactly when my baby started to get vocal. I wasn’t sure what to do as I had brought my double-wide stroller into the hall and the circle passed directly in front of the exit door. In addition I would have had to figure out how to open the double doors of the venue to get out (I had to seek help when I arrived earlier). Given it wasn’t a very formal meeting and we were in a community hall, I decided to wait. Besides, I wanted to hear what people had to say!

It didn‚Äôt take long before someone gave me a scowl and pointed to the door. I used the opportunity to quickly exit however I left feeling rather sad. I had put in a lot of effort to drag myself and these two young kids downtown to a budget meeting and was now being booted out?! At the same time, I didn‚Äôt want to ‚Äėruin‚Äô the meeting for anyone due to my crying baby.

Once I finished feeling sorry for myself, I reflected on two things:

  1. Why is it important to have children (or diversity in general) at community meetings?
  2. What can community organizers do to make meetings more inclusive of families?

These are my thoughts.

  1. Having young people at meetings is important for many reasons:
  • When you walk into the room and see children, it changes the vibe for the better.
    • We speak differently to each other (often kinder)
    • We are more patient
    • The mood is lighter (a child‚Äôs smile can brighten even the most boring budget meeting)
  • It is a reminder of community diversity.
    • Different segments of community will have different priorities. For example, an arena or a skatepark might be a budget burden for some people however for children it may be their anchor to the community
  • Children often say things that adults feel uncomfortable saying (usually these things need to be said).
  • Seeing a child in the room is a helpful reminder that the impacts of decisions made today will be felt by young people in the future
  • Instilling a sense of civic engagement in our children is key to a healthy community for the long-term.
  1. Some ways we could make meetings more inclusive of families are:
  • Include family-friendly in the advertising.
    • This lets parents know its okay to bring children
    • This helps everyone attending (including those without kids) understand that it will be a noisy meeting (kids make noise)
    • Facilitators can plan for noise and use microphones to help ensure everyone is heard (for example during a circle discussion)
  • During the meeting introduction, remind people that we are planning for everyone in the community. All voices are respected including those of little people.
  • Use visuals and have opportunities for drawing (as opposed to only speaking and¬†writing)
  • Choose meeting times that don‚Äôt interfere with meals and naps (i.e. finish by 5 or 5:30pm latest).
  • Provide healthy snacks for little people that are potentially missing dinner.
  • Provide child care so that parents can participate more effectively and children can easily be removed if the discussion is more serious.
  • If you ask a single parent with two kids to leave, at least help them to open the double doors so the stroller can get through quickly and quietly¬†ūüôā

Teaching our children to be civically engaged is important to sustaining healthy communities. I hope future community meeting participants embrace the noise!

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Sense making, friend making and glaciers

About a year ago, I was asked if I¬†could help make a traditional scientific symposium (International Glaciology Symposium on High Mountain Asia)¬†into something different. A group of glaciologists from ICIMOD, locally organizing the¬†international scientific symposium, and the IGS¬†scientific steering committee,¬†wanted people to leave saying ‘Wow! That was a great¬†conference!”

How could I resist?

Last month, after a lot of co-designing, back and forth,¬†and many changes up until the last moment…we did it.

Here is a bit of our story. You can also see the tweets and some images at #IGSKTM

The main areas we wanted to focus on were:

1. Sense making. 

Scientists are subjected to powerpoint presentations from morning to night, day after day. Typically there is very little time for questions, if at all. There are no discussions. Thus, participants leave a 5 day meeting possibly having seen 100’s of presentations yet having no time to digest them, let alone understand the bigger picture they might contribute to. We wanted to provide a legacy of learning – i.e. sense making of the content – for participants. They should leave remembering the key trends, patterns and emerging issues in their field of work.

After the daily keynote talk, tables took 5 minutes to create a newspaper headline.

After the daily keynote talk, tables took 5 minutes to create a newspaper headline.

Headline after a keynote in Black Carbon.

Headline from a table discussion after a keynote in Black Carbon.

2. Friend making.

Despite spending 5-6 days at a conference, often far from home, participants are rarely given the opportunity to meet and network. People who know each other typically sit together at the group dinners and traditionally the sessions have people sitting in rows (classroom style or theatre style) which doesn’t lend itself to conversation aside from one or two neighbours.¬†We wanted to ensure that people had ample time to meet and also help those who aren’t great at networking interact with their peers. Participants at this conference would hopefully leave having spoken to many new people, have the opportunity to find others working on similar fields of interest and simply increase their contacts and network¬†professionally.

Participants could pin where they work. The online roster was a place to see who these people actually are!

Participants could pin where they work. The online roster was a place to see who these people actually are!

People loved the poster sessions. We had a scavenger hunt at one to encourage people to find each other!

People loved the poster sessions. We had a scavenger hunt at one to encourage people to find each other!

3. Wow!

Leaving meetings tired and burnt out is not unique to science meetings. This is typical for most meeting goers and we wanted to make this one different. Rather than being tired at the end of the day, we wanted people to feel energized and excited. We strove to include sufficient content, discussion and fun to keep people going over 6 days talking about glaciers.

Here are some of the things we did to help shift a traditional scientific symposium into something people will remember:

  • Less formality
    • TV Talk show format to set the scene for the symposium (as opposed to traditional panel)
    • Seating at round tables to encourage conversing with colleagues and meeting new people (see their faces, as opposed to traditional seating in rows) [people were really shocked when they entered the room]
    • Large scale imagery in the venue to give a sense of the region despite meeting in Kathmandu (we were discussing the highest mountains in the world and we showed them!)
    • Outputs and visuals from discussions posted in coffee break areas so people could congregate around something.
  • Discussion and sense-making by participants for a greater synthesis of information
    • Tables created news headlines after key note talks [they had 5 minutes to discuss the talk, create a headline and this was followed by 10 mins of Q&A]
    • Tables worked on key questions throughout the day (after a set of science talks) that were later compiled and synthesized by session chairs and presented back to participants the following morning. [they had 10 mins after a set of talks to work on their synthesis questions as a table. Chairs created a daily summary to present in 5 minutes the following morning. They were very diligent.]
    • A full synthesis is envisaged as part of a long editorial for the Annals of Glaciology and for further communication purposes. The start was¬†put into a press release¬†distributed by ICIMOD following the event.
    • *Note we had to reduce the number of talks to have¬†time for¬†discussion (this took a lot of convincing) however we still managed to have 46¬†scientific talks plus 16¬†open space sessions (mentioned below) and the opening panel.
  • Time for conversations that matter
    • One morning was dedicated to open space, a technique where the participants create an agenda on the spot.
    • Over 100 participants proposed 16 topics which became one hour sessions (eight per parallel session).
    • Important conversations and connections were made. People‚Äôs interests and ideas were valued and appreciated.
    • Time taken at the¬†opening session¬†and closing session¬†to personally reflect on what you hope to get out of the symposium and what you learned. Participants were given time to share this with a friend, the table and the room. We used a technique called 1-2-4-all.
    • Field trip midway (this is typical for and IGS¬†and they like it…so we kept it!)
  • Networking onsite and for the future
    • A glaciologist scavenger hunt took place during the first poster session as a way to get people to learn about each other and connect with people they don‚Äôt normally talk to.
    • A map was posted where people added where they work so they could see others working in their region.
    • A roster was created where people added their name, contact email and research interests plus a photo. This will be sent out via email to help enable ongoing networking between the scientists.
    • Each day participants were encouraged to sit at new tables with new people to help change their conversations for the synthesis as well as meet new colleagues.

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Half a day was dedicated to  participants creating their own agenda on topics that mattered to them. Small break out sessions ensued.

Half a day was dedicated to participants creating their own agenda on topics that mattered to them. Small break out sessions of engaged people ensued.

IMG_2681 IMG_2680 IMG_2677

Some areas to consider in the future:

  • Longer poster sessions (in our case to accommodate the larger number of posters received). Perhaps timing the sessions at the end of the day would also make it easier to extend it for those who are interested. We had one at the end of the day however two were after lunch to help reduce the food coma issue. Though in retrospect people really loved the poster sessions and likely would have stayed late to continue their conversations had they all been at the end of the day.
  • Questions from science talks could be re-organized. For example rather than giving 5 mins for questions directly after speakers, let tables speak for 3 minutes after a talk to gather specific questions as a table. Then after a set of talks take 10 minutes of questions. This idea was proposed by a participant who felt the questions were not as well thought out as the synthesis which allowed for discussion before hand.
  • Include options for workshops on science communications. This is an idea being explored for future symposiums. How to make a great poster, give a presentation, get published, interact with the media and policy makers were all topics that emerged in our open space session.
  • Add a few fields to the online registration so a roster can be given out at the start of the symposium to participants to help facilitate networking immediately.

It was a very rewarding experience to work with these scientists. They have so much knowledge and energy. It was nice to be able to set the container to help great conversations happen, to make sense of the immense information presented and to suggest ways for colleagues to continue their contact after the symposium ended. Wow! That was fun!

p.s. an ICIMOD photographer was taking gorgeous photos. I will update the blog if I can get a few his.

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